When dealing with kitchen renovations Perth, it helps to have an expert on hand. Designers can help make the process easier, especially if you’re not entirely sure what you need but have an idea what you want.

However, there is a gap. When talking to a professional or expert, there’s always this little gap. It represents the holes between what you, as a client, want and they, as an expert, know. To help reduce the problem, it’s important to know the critical areas of the design.

These five are topics that you should absolutely discuss with your kitchen designer!

What to Talk About

Talk about the style and colour of your future kitchen. You want to love the look, don’t you?

Designers want to know what colour scheme you have in mind before they percolate ideas. It makes it so much easier, rather than guessing games based on the rest of the house. However, be sure to talk in the long-term, rather than chasing a trend.

A kitchen that doesn’t work is no kitchen at all!

Functionality is important in a kitchen. It should not only be warm and comfortable but should promote an easier, smoother flow of activity.

Talk to the designer about what you plan to do. Is it just a place to cook meals for the family? Do you intend to entertain guests there? Is it a place of relaxation and casual snacks? Each of these can affect the design of the aesthetics.

Speaking of the rest of the home, the designer needs to see that too. It helps to make a better, more seamless experience if the designer knows how you intend to fit the kitchen with the rest of the home. Or if you don’t plan on that at all.

This conversation is perhaps the most important in coming up with a cohesive plan. Though be warned that you and the designer might not always agree!

Materials should also be a consideration. You never, ever want to make this part up on the fly. Decide early on if you want quartz over granite, stone over porcelain, or other things.

Finally, talk about the budget. How much can you afford?

Sometimes, what you want simply is not in your price range. That’s okay. Accept it and ask if the designer has any ideas that can cut the costs or substitutions that are less expensive, but get the job done in a similar manner.